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Social Constructionism, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and the Discursive Approaches

  • Michelle O’Reilly
  • Jessica Nina Lester
Chapter
Part of the The Language of Mental Health book series (TLMH)

Abstract

In this chapter, O’Reilly and Lester highlight how a social constructionist perspective shapes the way in which analysts might employ discourse analysis for the study of ASD. Specifically, they divide this chapter into three sections. First, they offer an overview of social constructionism, highlighting how the linguistic turn shaped how scholars have come to view and ultimately study language. Second, they highlight the usefulness of approaching the study of autism from a variety of discourse perspectives. A general description of six key approaches to discourse analysis is provided, offering examples of how these approaches are used in practice. Finally, they discuss how social constructionist and discourse analysis perspectives inform the study of autism. Throughout, case examples are used to illustrate the key points offered.

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Recommended Reading

  1. Gee, J. P. (2010). How to do discourse analysis: A tool kit. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michelle O’Reilly
    • 1
  • Jessica Nina Lester
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Leicester, Greenwood Institute of Child HealthLeicesterUK
  2. 2.Indiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA

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