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Discursive Methods and the Cross-linguistic Study of ASD: A Conversation Analysis Case Study of Repetitive Language in a Malay-Speaking Child

  • Nor Azrita Mohamed Zain
  • Tom Muskett
  • Hilary Gardner
Chapter
Part of the The Language of Mental Health book series (TLMH)

Abstract

In this chapter, Mohamed Zain and colleagues provide an account of formulaic and repetitive language produced by a preschool-aged Malay-speaking child with mild ASD. Using conversation analysis (CA), they consider the functions of a repetitive expression, “apa tu” (“what’s that”), that was used frequently by the child across two 30-minute dyadic play sessions. By positioning the analyses against existing ASD-relevant findings about interactions involving English-speaking participants, the authors reflect upon the possibilities offered by CA for cross-linguistic research on diagnosed individuals.

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Recommended reading

  1. Daley, T. C. (2002). The need for cross-cultural research on the pervasive developmental disorders. Transcultural Psychiatry, 39, 531–550.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nor Azrita Mohamed Zain
    • 1
  • Tom Muskett
    • 2
  • Hilary Gardner
    • 3
  1. 1.International Islamic University Malaysia (Kuantan Campus)Kuala LumpurMalaysia
  2. 2.Leeds Beckett UniversityLeedsUK
  3. 3.University of SheffieldSheffieldUK

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