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Studying Intonation in Varieties of English: Gender and Individual Variation in Liverpool

  • Claire Nance
  • Sam Kirkham
  • Eve Groarke
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter we aim to address the paucity of sociophonetics studies of suprasegmental variation, specifically intonation, as identified in Foulkes et al. (2010). We first review previous sociophonetic approaches to intonation and identify solutions to methodological issues which have proved problematic in the past. Secondly, we present data from a small-scale study conducted on intonational variation in Liverpool across several sentence types. Data were collected from nine native Liverpudlians aged 20–22 years and analysed using Autosegmental Metrical analysis (Ladd 2008) and the phonetics of the pitch range employed by our speakers. Our results suggest gender variation in the contours produced and the pitch range used and also provide interesting directions for future study.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Claire Nance
    • 1
  • Sam Kirkham
    • 1
  • Eve Groarke
    • 2
  1. 1.Lancaster UniversityLancasterUK
  2. 2.NHSSheffieldUK

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