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The Population Census: Counting People Because They Count

  • Alphonse L. MacDonald
Chapter

Abstract

MacDonald explores the census as a major source of data to inform governments about the size, distribution and socio-demographic structure of their populations. Providing some historical background, he explains the significance of every country undertaking a national census every ten years by counting every person in the country with reference to a specific day and time. MacDonald describes the procedures census offices use to undertake a census and how they collect, analyse and disseminate data. He explains that, while the census informs planning and resource allocation in all sectors, it is particularly useful in providing the denominator for many health-related indices. MacDonald demonstrates how linking census data with routine administrative health data can support the equitable or rational establishment of health facilities.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alphonse L. MacDonald
    • 1
  1. 1.General Bureau of StatisticsParamariboSuriname

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