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Migration and Plurilingualism in Southern European Homes and Schools

  • Stefania Scaglione
  • Sandro Caruana
Chapter

Abstract

In this paper, we focus on some critical points pertaining to the conditions which characterize educational systems in some Southern European countries which have only recently become a destination for immigration. How can these systems respond to new multilingual and multicultural realities? Are they creating equal opportunities for all pupils? These questions will be addressed by presenting a selection of the results of a project which was carried out in primary schools in six Southern European countries. The multi-/plurilingualism which characterizes the language use of pupils with an immigrant background within the family domain will be discussed and compared to the language use promoted within school environments. Finally, the situation we observed will be compared to the perceptions and attitudes of parents/guardians towards intercultural and plurilingual education.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stefania Scaglione
    • 1
  • Sandro Caruana
    • 2
  1. 1.Università per Stranieri di PerugiaPerugiaItaly
  2. 2.Faculty of EducationUniversità ta’ MaltaMsidaMalta

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