Advertisement

Translanguaging as a Key to Educational Success: The Experience of One Irish Primary School

  • David Little
  • Déirdre Kirwan
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter reports on the development and implementation of an integrated approach to language education in an Irish primary school for girls whose pupil cohort displays an unusually high level of linguistic diversity. The chapter summarizes the impact of immigration on Ireland’s schoolgoing population, describes the official policy response and briefly profiles the school in question. Drawing on reports of classroom practice and examples of pupils’ written work, it then elaborates on the five factors that have shaped the school’s language policy and pedagogical practice: an inclusive ethos, an open language policy, a strong emphasis on the development of literacy skills, teaching methods that strive to be as explicit as possible and respect for teachers’ professional autonomy. The chapter concludes by quoting interview data from teachers and pupils and offering some brief reflections on sustainability and dissemination.

References

  1. Barnes, D. (1976). From communication to curriculum. Harmondsworth: Penguin.Google Scholar
  2. Ćatibušić, B., & Little, D. (2014). Immigrant pupils learn English: A CEFR-related empirical study of L2 development (English Profile Studies 3). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Cook, V. (2002). Background to the L2 user. In V. Cook (Ed.), Portraits of the L2 user (pp. 1–28). Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
  4. Council of Europe. (2001). Common European framework of reference for languages: Learning, teaching, assessment. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Council of Europe. (2011). European Language Portfolio (ELP): Principles and guidelines, with added explanatory notes. Strasbourg: Council of Europe. http://www.coe.int/t/dg4/education/elp/elp-reg. Date Accessed 19 Oct 2015.
  6. Cummins, J., & Early, M. (2011). Identity texts: The collaborative creation of power in multilingual schools. Stoke-on-Trent: Trentham Books.Google Scholar
  7. Dam, L. (1995). Learner autonomy 3: From theory to classroom practice. Dublin: Authentik.Google Scholar
  8. DES and OMI. (2010). Intercultural education strategy, 2010–2015. Dublin: Department of Education and Skills and Office of the Minister for Integration.Google Scholar
  9. Flores, N., & García, O. (2013). Linguistic third spaces in education: Teachers’ translanguaging across the bilingual continuum. In D. Little, C. Leung, & P. Van Avermaet (Eds.), Managing diversity in education: Languages, policies, pedagogies (pp. 243–256). Bristol: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
  10. García, O., & Wei, L. (2014). Translanguaging: Language, bilingualism and education. London: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. IILT. (2003a). English Language Proficiency Benchmarks for non-English-speaking pupils at primary level (primary publications), version 2.0. http://www.ncca.ie/iilt. Date Accessed 19 Oct 2015.
  12. IILT. (2003b). English Language Proficiency Benchmarks for non-English-speaking pupils at post-primary level (post-primary publications), version 2.0. http://www.ncca.ie/iilt. Date Accessed 19 Oct 2015.
  13. IILT. (2004a). European Language Portfolio: Learning the language of the host community (primary publications). http://www.ncca.ie/iilt. Date Accessed 19 Oct 2015.
  14. IILT. (2004b). European Language Portfolio: Learning the language of the host community (post-primary publications). http://www.ncca.ie/iilt. Date Accessed 19 Oct 2015.
  15. IILT. (2006). Up and Away: A resource book for English language support in primary schools (primary publications). http://www.ncca.ie/iilt. Date Accessed 22 Sep 2014.
  16. IILT and SELB. (2007). Together towards inclusion: Toolkit for diversity in the primary school (primary publications). http://www.ncca.ie/iilt. Date Accessed 19 Oct 2015.
  17. Kirwan, D. (2009). English language support for newcomer learners in Irish primary schools: A review and a case study (Unpublished PhD thesis). University of Dublin, Trinity College.Google Scholar
  18. Kirwan, D. (2013). From English language support to plurilingual awareness. In D. Little, C. Leung, & P. Van Avermaet (Eds.), Managing diversity in education: Languages, policies, pedagogies (pp. 189–203). Bristol: Multilingual Matters.Google Scholar
  19. Little, D. (1991). Learner autonomy 1: Definitions, issues and problems. Dublin: Authentik.Google Scholar
  20. Little, D., Lazenby Simpson, B., & Finnegan Ćatibušić, B. (2007). Primary school assessment kit. http://www.ncca.ie (Primary publications). Dublin: Department of Education and Science. Date Accessed 19 Oct 2015.

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Little
    • 1
  • Déirdre Kirwan
    • 2
  1. 1.Trinity College DublinDublinIreland
  2. 2.Scoil Bhríde (Cailíní)Blanchardstown, DublinIreland

Personalised recommendations