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Feminism and Gender

  • Kimberly J. SternEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter presents an overview of major shifts in feminist theory from the latter part of the twentieth century to the present day, highlighting the recuperative power of critical approaches that have sometimes been treated as obsolete, incoherent, or even embattled. If scholars of gender often claim to have surpassed the work of their forebears, it is worth remembering that we all work within a critical tradition that we have created and imbued with the theoretical investments of the present. Tracking the development of literary approaches to gender from ‘recovery’ feminism to more recent innovations in digital and transgender studies, Stern argues for a recursive approach to the history of feminism and gender, one that acknowledges a less linear and more variegated field of concerns.

Keywords

Recovery Digital Transgender Tradition Recuperative 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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