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Cultural Heritage Offences: A View from Asia

  • Stefan Gruber
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of a wide range of cultural heritage offences which are most relevant to the Asian context, including the pillaging of archaeological sites, art theft, illicit art trafficking and trade, art forgery and fraud. It also highlights corresponding countermeasures, ranging from policing and prosecution to soft strategies and prevention, to international cooperation and the restitution of illegally exported cultural artefacts.

Keywords

Asia China Trafficking Forgeries Cultural property 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stefan Gruber
    • 1
  1. 1.Kyoto UniversityKyotoJapan

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