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Conception of Justice: Axial Age—India, China and Greece

  • Abbas MirakhorEmail author
  • Hossein Askari
Chapter
Part of the Political Economy of Islam book series (PEoI)

Abstract

By the time of the Upanishads, kingship had become an institution and society had become stratified. All humans were subject to the law of Karma. Their present conditions reflected the lives they had lived in the past. The cornerstone of Confucius’ thoughts on justice is the concept of Ren, which consists of a number of virtues and is the means of building a society composed of righteous and virtuous individuals. The Greek conception of justice in the Axial Age begins with the epic poems of Homer and Hesiod. A just person in the Greek Axial Age would be someone with respect for what the values, customs and traditions which the society considered the rights of others. Among later thinkers, there were a number who clarified the thinking on justice, culminating in the thoughts of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.La JuntaUSA
  2. 2.LeesburgUSA

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