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Mapping Educational Policy Borrowing and Lending

  • Laura M. Portnoi
Chapter

Abstract

Portnoi provides an overview of educational policy borrowing and lending, highlighting the political nature of these processes. The policy borrowing and lending continuum, with coercive lending on one side and voluntary transfer on the other, provides a useful way for considering the influences and purposes involved in policy borrowing. When intentionally borrowing policies, countries often undertake ‘quick fix’ or symbolic reforms for political reasons such as an upcoming election. In other cases, countries enact policies to comply with international mandates and conventions. Lending countries also have political motivations because they gain cache as ‘star’ systems that others wish to emulate. Global governance organizations also play a significant role, especially through the diffusion of ‘best practice’ reforms.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Laura M. Portnoi
    • 1
  1. 1.California State UniversityLong BeachUSA

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