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Globalization and Education

  • Laura M. Portnoi
Chapter

Abstract

Portnoi interrogates the relationship between globalization and education, covering a range of developments within both schooling and higher education. ‘Globalization and Education’ also highlights the relationship between education and development, and the influence of global governance organizations through policy diffusion in the educational realm. Several global declarations are introduced, including Education for All, the Millennium Development Goals/Sustainable Development Goals, and the Fast Track Initiative/Global Partnership for Education. The debate regarding the convergence of a ‘world culture’ of schooling is outlined, and Portnoi argues that despite global trends, most developments and reforms in education (and in other sectors) are localized through vernacular globalization.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Laura M. Portnoi
    • 1
  1. 1.California State UniversityLong BeachUSA

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