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Understanding Globalization

  • Laura M. Portnoi
Chapter

Abstract

‘Understanding Globalization’ provides a comprehensive overview of the history of globalization and the various ways this contested term has been conceptualized. Portnoi outlines the economic, political, cultural, social, technological, and ecological dimensions of globalization as well as its costs, benefits, and dilemmas. Key areas of debate around globalization include the formation of a world culture, the inevitability of globalization, and the role of nation-states. These debates draw from multiple disciplines, including globalization studies, political science, and education.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Laura M. Portnoi
    • 1
  1. 1.California State UniversityLong BeachUSA

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