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Illegal

  • Amanda Espinosa-Aguilar
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter discusses the shifting meaning of the interdependent terms “illegal immigrant” and “citizen” in anti-immigrant rhetoric and anti-immigration legislation.

It shows how fear and concerns about status preservation are exploited discursively in racist campaigns and laws. It argues that this exploitation results in laws that maintain the disenfranchisement of all immigrants, especially Latinxs, the largest growing segment of the US population.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Open Access This chapter is licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/), which permits any noncommercial use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license and indicate if changes were made.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Amanda Espinosa-Aguilar
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EnglishColumbia Basin CollegePascoUSA

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