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Transitional Justice, Gender-Based Violence, and Women’s Rights

  • Evelyn Fanneron
  • Eunice N. Sahle
  • Kari Dahlgren
Chapter
Part of the Contemporary African Political Economy book series (CONTAPE)

Abstract

In this chapter, Evelyn Fanneron, Eunice N. Sahle, and Kari Dahlgren examine sources of gender-based violence in the context of conflict. Further, they explore the gendered underpinnings of transitional justice drawing on transitional justice mechanisms (TJMs in Rwanda and Sierra Leone). The chapter pays particular attention to these TJMs’ approach to wartime sexual violence in order to assess the ways in which they have begun to account for gendered harms and the ways in which they have not yet achieved gendered justice. To achieve its aims, the chapter draws insights from feminist concerns regarding human rights discourse and TJMs’ approaches to gender-based violence and wartime sexual violence.

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© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Evelyn Fanneron
    • 1
  • Eunice N. Sahle
    • 2
  • Kari Dahlgren
    • 3
  1. 1.White & CaseNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.University of North Carolina Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  3. 3.Department of AnthropologyLondon School of EconomicsLondonUK

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