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Models of Elite Integration

  • Fredrik Engelstad
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, elites are associated with the possession of decisive political power that gives them disproportionate influence on political and social outcomes. Two opposing views of elite power in democracies are found in the literature. One is of a coalescent power structure or “power elite” and the other is of a pluralistic power structure consisting of elite groups located in diverse economic, governmental, military, media, scientific, and other sectors. The accuracy of these two conflicting views of elite power is treated as an empirical question and takes the pluralist view as the point of departure without, however, ruling out the coalescent view.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fredrik Engelstad
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Oslo, Institute for Social ResearchOsloNorway

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