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Introduction

  • Christina Richards
  • Walter Pierre Bouman
  • Meg-John Barker
Chapter
Part of the Critical and Applied Approaches in Sexuality, Gender and Identity book series (CAASGI)

Abstract

People with genderqueer or non-binary genders identify as a gender other than male or female, either all or part of the time. There are a wide variety of identities and practices contained within these overarching terms, with some people opting for physical interventions to bring their body in line with their identity and some not feeling that this is necessary for them. This is a fast-developing and emerging field with little formal scientific research, but which is increasingly inspiring such research, and which is increasingly represented in wider social contexts. This chapter considers these matters and signposts to the rest of the book and the wider literature.

References

  1. Barker, M. (2014, February 15). 57 Genders (and None for Me)? Reflections on the New Facebook Gender Categories. Rewriting the Rules. Retrieved June 13, 2014, from http://www.rewritingtherules.wordpress.com/2014/02/15/57-genders-and-none-for-me-reflections-on-the-new-facebook-gender-categories
  2. Brisbane, L. (2015, June 22). Why Miley Cyrus and Ruby Rose are Embracing ‘Gender Fluidity’. The Evening Standard. Retrieved August 10, 2015, from http://www.standard.co.uk/lifestyle/london-life/why-miley-cyrus-and-ruby-rose-are-embracing-gender-fluidity-10335949.html
  3. Bornstein, K. (1994). Gender Outlaw. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  4. Butler, J. (1999). Gender Trouble. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
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  6. Harrison, J., Grant, J., & Herman, J. L. (2012). A Gender Not Listed Here: Genderqueers, Gender Rebels, and Otherwise in the National Transgender Discrimination Survey. Los Angeles: eScholarship, University of California.Google Scholar
  7. Hegarty, P., Ansara, G., & Barker, M.-J. (2017). Non-Binary Gender Identities. In N. Dess, J. Marecek, D. Best, & L. Bell (Eds.), Psychology of Gender, Sex, and Sexualities. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  8. Joel, D., Tarrasch, R., Berman, Z., Mukamel, M., & Ziv, E. (2013). Queering Gender: Studying Gender Identity in ‘Normative’ Individuals. Psychology & Sexuality, 5(4), 291–321.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Queen, C., & Schimel, L. (Eds.). (1997). PoMoSexuals. San Francisco: Cleis Press.Google Scholar
  10. Richards, C. (2014). Third Genders. The Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Gender and Sexuality Studies. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.Google Scholar
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  14. Vincent, B., & Erikainen, S. (2016, March 22). Moving Beyond the Binaries Of Sex And Gender: Non-Binary Identities, Bodies, and Discourses. University of Leeds Conference. Conference Booklet. Retrieved from http://www.gires.org.uk/pdfs/Conference%20Booklet.pdf
  15. Wilchins, R. A. (1997). Read My Lips: Sexual Subversion and the End of Gender. Ann Arbor, MI: Firebrand Books.Google Scholar

Further Reading

  1. Bornstein, K. (1994). Gender Outlaw. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  2. Bornstein, K., & Bergman, S. B. (Eds.). (2010). Gender Outlaws: The Next Generation. New York: Avalon Publishing Group.Google Scholar
  3. Butler, J. (1999). Gender Trouble. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  4. Barker, M. J., & Richards, C. (2015). Further Genders. In C. Richards & M. Barker (Eds.), Handbook of the Psychology of Sexuality and Gender (pp. 166–182). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  5. Queen, C., & Schimel, L. (Eds.). (1997). PoMoSexuals. San Francisco: Cleis Press.Google Scholar
  6. Richards, C., Bouman, W. P., Seal, L., Barker, M. J., Nieder, T., & T’Sjoen, G. (2016). Non-binary or Genderqueer Genders. International Review of Psychiatry, 28(1), 95–102.Google Scholar
  7. Wilchins, R. A. (1997). Read My Lips: Sexual Subversion and the End of Gender. Ann Arbor, MI: Firebrand Books.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christina Richards
    • 1
  • Walter Pierre Bouman
    • 1
  • Meg-John Barker
    • 2
  1. 1.Nottingham Center for Transgender HealthNottinghamUK
  2. 2.The Open UniversityMilton KeynesUK

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