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Central and East European Housing Regimes in the Light of Private Renting

  • József Hegedüs
  • Vera Horváth
  • Martin Lux
Chapter

Abstract

Despite some salient similarities in Central and East European housing sectors, including their small share of social housing due to mass privatisation in the 1990s, their pro-home-ownership housing policy environment, and a level of informality in private renting which may seem outstanding in a European comparison, transition countries in the CEE region also have some important housing regime differences, which are made apparent by examining their private rental sectors (PRS). Based on the conclusions drawn from editing this volume, the chapter looks at converging and diverging trends across the region, points out common issues and important outliers, and considers in particular the role private rented housing could play in accommodating low-income and vulnerable households, for whom securing home-ownership is not a realistic and sustainable option.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • József Hegedüs
    • 1
  • Vera Horváth
    • 1
  • Martin Lux
    • 2
  1. 1.Metropolitan Research InstituteBudapestHungary
  2. 2.Institute of Sociology of the Czech Academy of SciencesPragueCzech Republic

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