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Workers’ and Union Participation at US Workplaces

  • Harry C. Katz
  • Arthur Wheaton
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter analyzes the nature of employee participation in the United States making use of the framework provided in Katz and Darbishire (Converging Divergences: Worldwide Changes in Employment Systems. ILR/Cornell University Press, Ithaca, 2000), which describes various patterns of industrial relations in union and nonunion workplaces as well as recent pressures that have increased the variation in work practices within the various work practice patterns. Historically, there has been very few cases of national-level tripartism in the United States due to the prevalence of decentralized collective bargaining, a relatively small union sector, and strong market-oriented and voluntarist traditions. This goes along with the fact that employer organizations are relatively unimportant in the United States. Since the early 1980s, some meaningful efforts of union and employee engagement in work restructuring have emerged at the shop-floor level, but these local labor-management partnerships have not broadened.

Keywords

Decentralized collective bargaining Patterns of industrial relations Nonunion employment systems Voluntarism Union revitalization efforts 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harry C. Katz
    • 1
  • Arthur Wheaton
    • 2
  1. 1.Scheinman Institute on Conflict ResolutionCornell University ILR SchoolIthacaUSA
  2. 2.Scheinman Institute on Conflict Resolution; Worker InstituteCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

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