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Workers’ Participation in Management at Plant Level in Nigeria

  • Funmi Adewumi
Chapter

Abstract

Even though the idea of industrial democracy with workers’ participation at its core is rooted in Western Europe, it also gained popularity in Nigeria as Funmi Adewumi elaborates. First, he outlines the structural characteristics of the Nigerian economy such as core industries, employment trends, and working population. He goes on by explaining the industrial and employment relations dynamics in Nigeria which are influenced by the colonial past to the present day, as well as the institutional and legal framework. He demonstrates that the formal labor legislation following tripartite ideals is rarely enforced in present practice and therefore closes by offering recommendations on how to extend workers’ participation, especially on management level and industrial democracy in Nigeria.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Funmi Adewumi
    • 1
  1. 1.LagosNigeria

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