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Workers’ Participation in Czechia and Slovakia

  • Jan Drahokoupil
  • Marta KahancováEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter reviews the formation, regulation, and practice of worker participation in Czechia and Slovakia since state socialism before 1989, throughout economic transformations in the 1990s and EU accession and the implementation of the Directive on Information and Consultation of Employees after 2002.

It shows that worker participation is firmly institutionalized and embedded in both countries’ legal systems with trade unions serving as most important organizations. The relevance of Works Councils and other participation forms remains marginal. The actual practice of worker participation is declining due to decreasing union and employer densities, bargaining decentralization, and strong dependence of employment relations on labor legislation in both countries. Strengthening worker participation requires overcoming power struggles between trade unions and Works Councils and more initiatives facilitating workplace democracy.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.European Trade Union Institute (ETUI)BrusselsBelgium
  2. 2.Central European Labour Studies Institute (CELSI)BratislavaSlovakia

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