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Towards a Narrative Model of Code-Switching in Diasporic Writing

  • Michela Baldo
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter examines how narrative theory and translation can be combined, through the notion of written code-switching, the switch from a language into another, into a model of analysis that can be used to examine the notion of return in Italian-Canadian diasporic writing and in its Italian translation. This chapter begins by looking at the meaning of focalisation and voice in classical and poststructuralist narratology, and in narrative theory, arguing that these elements concern the visual and aural point around which our narrative subjectivities are turned into plots that make sense. It then discusses the notion of code-switching, the switch from a language to another, paying specific attention to the fictional and pragmatic aspect of written code-switching and to studies which investigate its translation. The model finally links code-switching to the narratological concepts of focalisation, voice and plot, within the framework of studies of style in translation and narrative theory, demonstrating that in diasporic writing narratives are “translational”, as they are assumed to be founded on translation.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Michela Baldo
    • 1
  1. 1.Modern Languages and CulturesUniversity of HullHullUK

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