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Introduction: Translation, Narratives and Returns

  • Michela Baldo
Chapter

Abstract

This book revolves around the analysis of a corpus of texts by Italian-Canadian writers: Mary Melfi, Nino Ricci and Frank Paci. Before delving into the discussion of the texts, this chapter introduces the main theoretical concepts, which have underpinned the textual analysis, namely translation, narrative and return. Translation is theorised here as a metaphor for return and as a metaphor for writing. Both metaphors originate from studies of diaspora as a term referring to conditions of displacement and to the translation of such displacement. Translation is best represented in this scenario by the use of heterolingualism, which exemplifies the movement back and forth between different points of view and voices, belonging to the Italian and Canadian sphere of consciousness. Since voice and perspective are narrative concepts, it is through theories of narrative that returns are discussed.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Michela Baldo
    • 1
  1. 1.Modern Languages and CulturesUniversity of HullHullUK

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