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The Use and Abuse of Aggregate Demand and Supply Functions

  • J. W. Nevile
  • B. Bhaskara Rao
Chapter

Abstract

Aggregate demand and supply analysis is the basic paradigm presented to students in virtually all modern textbooks. This chapter aims to show that, as presented in the textbooks, aggregate demand and supply analysis has several weaknesses, the most serious of which is the use of contradictory assumptions or inconsistent modes of thought.

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Copyright information

© Joseph Halevi, G. C. Harcourt, Peter Kriesler and J. W. Nevile 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. W. Nevile
  • B. Bhaskara Rao

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