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Human Trafficking in Context

  • Simon MasseyEmail author
  • Glynn Rankin
Chapter
  • 3 Downloads

Abstract

The chapter puts the crime, and concept, of human trafficking in context. Human trafficking is caused by a variety of cultural and economic drivers, including push factors such as gender and social discrimination, poverty and the absence of employment opportunities. Whilst data on the prevalence of human trafficking remains inconsistent, it is clear that the crime poses a serious threat that is most likely under-estimated in the existing statistics. International law, notably the UN Trafficking Protocol, stipulates that the offence should be dealt with as a process comprised of three constituent elements—action, means and purpose. However, increasing variation in the way in which the crime is framed in domestic law, especially the shift in the UK towards the broader offence of modern slavery, has the potential to dilute human trafficking as a stand-alone offence.

Keywords:

Push-factors Prevalence Process Constituent elements Modern slavery 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Arts and HumanitiesCoventry UniversityCoventryUK
  2. 2.Liverpool John Moores UniversityLiverpoolUK

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