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F. A. Hayek pp 257-281 | Cite as

The Reconstruction of the Liberal Project

  • Peter J. Boettke
Chapter
Part of the Great Thinkers in Economics book series (GTE)

Abstract

Hayek was a major player in the rebirth of the classical liberal project. His The Constitution of Liberty (1960) and Law, Legislation and Liberty (1973–1979) served as the foundations for the subsequent work of other classical liberal thinkers. Hayek developed a liberal (as opposed to illiberal) view of classical liberalism in which the end goal is the freeing of the creative energies of individuals. In order to be as productive, inventive, and creative as they possibly can, individuals must be left free to use their knowledge and property according to their independently devised plans. Hence, Hayek’s view of liberty is neither merely “negative” nor “positive.” His liberalism is a truly progressive, universalist, and cosmopolitan political philosophy.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter J. Boettke
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsGeorge Mason UniversityFairfaxUSA
  2. 2.F. A. Hayek Program for Advanced Study in Philosophy, Politics and Economics Mercatus CenterGeorge Mason UniversityFairfaxUSA

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