Advertisement

Use of altimeter data in estimating global gravity models

  • Richard H. Rapp
Lectures
Part of the Lecture Notes in Earth Sciences book series (LNEARTH, volume 50)

Keywords

Gravity Anomaly Altimeter Data Spherical Harmonic Expansion Geopotential Model Reference Ellipsoid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Basíc, T. and R. Rapp, Oceanwide predictions of gravity anomalies and sea surface heights using Geos-3, Seasat and Geosat altimeter data, and ETOPO5U bathymetric data, Report No. 416, Dept. of Geodetic Science and Surveying, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1991.Google Scholar
  2. Bosch, W., High degree spherical harmonic analysis by least squares, presented at the XIX IUGG General Assembly, (DGFI, München), August 1987.Google Scholar
  3. Brenner, A.C., C.J. Koblinsky and B.C. Beckley, A preliminary estimate of geoid induced variations in repeat orbit altimeter satellite observations, J. Geophys. Res., 95, 13, 3033–3040, 1991.Google Scholar
  4. Chelton, D., WOCE/NASA Altimeter Algorithm Workshop, O.S. WOCE Technical Report No. 2, 70 pp., U.S. Planning Office for WOCE, College Station, TX, 1988.Google Scholar
  5. Chelton, D.B. and M.G. Schlax, Spectral characteristics of time-dependent orbit errors in altimeter height measurements, manuscript submitted to J. Geophys. Res., Oceans, April 1992.Google Scholar
  6. Colombo, O.L., Numerical methods for harmonic analysis on the sphere, Report No. 310, Dept. of Geodetic Science and Surveying, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1981.Google Scholar
  7. Colombo, O.L., Altimetry, orbits and tides, NASA Tech. Memo. 86180, Greenbelt, MD, 1984.Google Scholar
  8. Colombo, O.L. The dynamics of global positioning system orbits and the determination of precise ephemerides, J. Geophys, Res., 94, 9167–9182, 1989.Google Scholar
  9. Cruz, J., Ellipsoidal corrections to potential coefficients obtained from gravity anomaly data on the ellipsoid, Report No. 317, Dept. of Geodetic Science and Surveying, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1986.Google Scholar
  10. Denker, H. and R.H. Rapp, Geodetic and oceanographic results from the analysis of 1 year of Geosat data, J. Geophys. Res., 95, C8, 13,151–13,168, 1990.Google Scholar
  11. DMA, Supplement to Department of Defense World Geodetic System 1984 Technical Report, Part I, Methods, Techniques, and Data Used in WGS84 Development, DMA, Washington, D.C., 20305–3000, 1987.Google Scholar
  12. Engelis, T., Radial orbit error reduction and sea surface topography determination using satellite altimetry, Report No. 377, Dept. of Geodetic Science and Surveying, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1987a.Google Scholar
  13. Engelis, T., Spherical harmonic expansion of the Levitus sea surface topography, Report No. 385, Dept. of Geodetic Science and Surveying, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1987b.Google Scholar
  14. Farelly, B., The geodetic approximations in the conversion of geoid height to gravity anomaly by Fourier transform, Bulletin Geodesique, 65, 2, 92–101, 1991.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Forsberg, R., A study of terrain reductions, density anomalies and geophysical inversion methods in gravity field modeling, Report No. 365, Dept. of Geodetic Science and Surveying, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1984.Google Scholar
  16. Gleason, D.M., Comparing ellipsoidal corrections to the transformation between the geopotential's spherical and ellipsoidal spectrums, manusc. geod., 13, 114–129, 1988.Google Scholar
  17. Gruber, T. and W. Bosch, A new 360 gravity field model, presented at the European Geophysical Society meeting, Edinburgh, April 1992.Google Scholar
  18. Haagmans, R., Detailed gravity anomalies derived from Seasat altimeter data, a comparison of two alternative approaches; least squares collocation and a method based on FFT, Afstudeerscriptel, August 1988.Google Scholar
  19. Heiskanen, W. and H. Moritz, Physical Geodesy, W.H. Freeman, New York, 1967.Google Scholar
  20. Hwang, C., High precision gravity anomaly and sea surface height estimation from Geos-3/Seasat satellite altimeter data, Report No. 399, Dept. of Geodetic Science and Surveying, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1989.Google Scholar
  21. Hwang, C., Orthogonal functions over the oceans and applications to the determination of orbit errors, geoid and sea surface topography from satellite altimetry, Report No. 414, Dept. of Geodetic Science and Surveying, The Ohio State University, Columbus, December 1991.Google Scholar
  22. International Association of Geodesy, Geodetic reference system 1967, Spec. Publ. Bull. Geod., p. 72, Paris, 1971.Google Scholar
  23. Jekeli, C., The exact transformation between ellipsoidal and spherical harmonic expansions, manusc. geod., 13, 106–113, 1988.Google Scholar
  24. Katsambalos, K.E., The effect of the smoothing operator on potential coefficient determinations, Report No. 287, Dept. of Geodetic Science and Surveying, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1979.Google Scholar
  25. Kaula, W.M. Tests and combinations of satellite determinations of the gravity field with gravimetry J. Geophys. Res., 71, 5303–5314, 1966.Google Scholar
  26. Knudsen, P., Estimation of sea surface topography in the Norwegian sea using gravimetry and Geosat altimetry, Bulletin Geodesique, 66, 1, 27–40, 1992.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Koblinsky, C.J., L.E. Braata, T.L. Engelis, S.M. Klosko and R.G. Williamson, Geocenter definition in the determination of dynamic height using Geosat satellite altimetry (abstract), Eos Trans. AGU, 70, (43), 1051, 1989.Google Scholar
  28. Lerch, F.J. et al., Geopotential models of the Earth from satellite tracking, altimeter and surface gravity observations: GEM-T3 and GEM-T3S, NASA Technical Memorandum 104555, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, 1992.Google Scholar
  29. LeTraon, P.Y., C. Boisser and P. Gaspar, Analysis of errors due to polynomial adjustment of altimeter profiles J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol., 8, 385–396, 1991.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Levitus, S., Climatological Atlas of the World Ocean, NOAA Professional Paper 13, U.S. Govt. Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1982.Google Scholar
  31. Marsh, J.G. et al., Dynamic sea surface topography, gravity, and improved orbit accuracies from the direct evaluation of Seasat altimeter data. J. Geophys. Res., 95, C8, 13, 129–13, 1990.Google Scholar
  32. McAdoo, D. and K. Marks, Gravity fields of the southern oceans from Geosat data, J. Geophys. Res., 97, B3, 3247–3260, 1992.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Moritz, H., Advanced Physical Geodesy, Herbert Wichmann, Karlsruhe, Germany, 1989.Google Scholar
  34. National Geophysical Data Center, ETOPO5, Digital relief of the surface of the Earth, Report 86-MGG-07, Boulder, Colorado, 1986.Google Scholar
  35. Nerem, R.S. and C.J. Koblinsky, The geoid and ocean circulation, in Geophysical Interpretation of the Geoid, ed. Vanĩcek and Christou, CRC Press, Boca Rotan, Fl., 1992.Google Scholar
  36. Pavlis, N.K. and R.H. Rapp, The development of an isostatic gravitational model to degree 360 and its use in global gravity modelling, Geophys. J. Int., 100, 369–378, 1990.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Pavlis, N.K., Modeling and estimation of a low degree geopotential model from terrestrial gravity data, Report No. 386, Dept. of Geodetic Science and Surveying, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1988.Google Scholar
  38. Rapp, R.H. and J.Y. Cruz, Spherical harmonic expansions of the Earth's gravitational potential to degree 360 using 30′ mean anomalies, Report No. 376, Dept. of Geodetic Science and Surveying, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1986a.Google Scholar
  39. Rapp, R.H. and N.K. Pavlis, The development and analysis of geopotential coefficient models to spherical harmonic degree 360, J. Geophys. Res., 95, B13, 21,885–21,911, 1990.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Rapp, R.H. and Y.M. Wang, Geoid undulation differences between geopotential models, Surveys in Geophysics (in press), 1992.Google Scholar
  41. Rapp, R.H., Combination of satellite, altimetric and terrestrial gravity data, in Theory of Satellite Geodesy and Gravity Field Determination, edited by F. Sanso and R. Rummel, pp. 261–284, Springer-Verlag, New York, 1989.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Rapp, R.H., GEOS 3 data processing for the recovery of geoid undulations and gravity anomalies, J. Geophys. Res., 84, 3784–3792, 1979.Google Scholar
  43. Rapp, R.H., Gravity anomalies and sea surface heights derived from a combined GEOS 3/Seasat Altimeter Data Set, J. Geophys. Res., 91, B5, 4867–4876, 1986.Google Scholar
  44. Rapp, R.H., The Earth's gravity field to degree and order 180 using Seasat altimeter data, terrestrial gravity data, and other data, Report No. 332, Dept. of Geodetic Science and Surveying, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1981.Google Scholar
  45. Rapp, R.H., Y.M. Wang and N.K. Pavlis, The Ohio State 1991 geopotential and sea surface topography harmonic coefficient models, Report 410, Dept. of Geodetic Science and Surveying, The Ohio State University, Columbus, December 1991.Google Scholar
  46. Reigber, C. et al., GRIM4-C1 and C2; Combination solutions of the global earth gravity field, presentation at the meeting of the European Geophysical Society, Wiesbaden, Germany, April 1991.Google Scholar
  47. Rummel, R. and R. Rapp, Undulation and anomaly estimation using Geos-3 altimeter data without precise satellite orbits, Bulletin Geodesique, 51, 73–88, 1977.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Sandwell, D.T. and D.C. McAdoo, Marine gravity of the Southern Ocean and Antarctic margin from Geosat, J. Geophys, Res., 93, B9, 10,389–10,396, 1988.Google Scholar
  49. Schwintzer, P. et al., A new earth gravity field model in support of ERS-1 and SPOT-2: GRIM4-S1/C1, Final Report to the German Space Agency (DARA) and the French Space Agency (CNES), 1991.Google Scholar
  50. Suenkel, H., Gravity field determination, Gerlands Beitraege zur Geophysik 96, 54–74, Leipzig, 1987.Google Scholar
  51. Tai, C.K., Accuracy assessment of widely used orbit error approximations in satellite altimetry, J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol., 6, 147–150, 1988.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Tscherning, C. C. and R. Forsberg, Geoid determinations in the Nordic countries from gravity and height data, Bulletino di Geodesia e Science Affini, 21–43, Florence, Italy, 1987.Google Scholar
  53. Uotila, U.A., Notes on adjustment computations, Part I. Dept. of Geodetic Science and Surveying, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1986.Google Scholar
  54. Wagner, C.A., Radial variations of a satellite orbit due to geopotential errors: Implications for satellite altimetry, J. Geophys. Res., 90, 3027–3036, 1985.Google Scholar
  55. Wang, Y.M. and R.H. Rapp, Geoid gradients for Geosat and Topex/Poseidon repeat ground tracks, Report No. 408, Dept. of Geodetic Science and Surveying, The Ohio State University, Columbus, June 1991.Google Scholar
  56. Wang, Y.M. and R.H. Rapp, The determination of a one year mean sea surface height track from Geosat altimeter data and ocean variability implementations, Bulletin Geodesique, (in press), 1992.Google Scholar
  57. Wang, Y.M., Downward continuation of the free-air gravity anomalies to the ellipsoid using the gradient solution, Poisson's integral and terrain correction: Numerical comparison and the computations, Report No. 393, Dept. of Geodetic Science and Surveying, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1988.Google Scholar
  58. Wenzel, H.G., Hochauflösende Kugelfunktionsmodelle für das Gravitationspotential der Erde, Wiss. Arb. 137, Fachrichtung Vermess. der Univ. Hannover, Hannover, Federal Republic of Germany, 1985.Google Scholar
  59. Wichiencharoen, C., FORTRAN programs for computing geoid undulations from potential coefficients and gravity anomalies, internal report, Dept. of Geodetic Science and Surveying, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 1982.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard H. Rapp
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Geodetic Science and SurveyingThe Ohio State UniversityColumbusU.S.A.

Personalised recommendations