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Gels pp 64-70 | Cite as

Networks of surfactant-made physical organogels

  • P. Terech
Conference paper
Part of the Progress in Colloid & Polymer Science book series (PROGCOLLOID, volume 102)

Abstract

Thermoreversible networks can be formed from associated small molecules in appropriate organic solvents. The present paper reports on the use of neutrons and x-ray scattering techniques to probe the structural features of the colloidal aggregates constituting the gel networks and on rheological experiments which characterize some of the dynamic and semi-static properties. Four types of gel systems, characterized by the nature of their junction zones, are discussed. Depending upon the chemical constitution of the gelators, fibers, semi-rigid molecular threads and rods can be formed and give, above the overlap threshold (of the order of 0.5–1%), gels with high yield stress values, pseudo-plastic fluids or thixotropic gels, respectively. The specific examples of 12-hydroxystearic acid (HSA), cholesteryl anthraquinone-2-carboxylate (CAQ), binuclear copper (II) tetracarboxylate (Cu2S8) and a trisubstituted metalloporphyrin, zinc (II) 5-(p-carboxyphenyl)-10, 15, 20-tris(p-hexadecyloxycarbonylphenyl) porphyrinate, (ZnP3), are discussed.

Key words

61.12E-Neutron scattering technqieus 82.70D-Colloids 

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Copyright information

© Dr. Dietrich Steinkopff Verlag GmbH & Co. KG 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Terech
    • 1
  1. 1.Département de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matière CondenséeSI3M PCM C.E.A.-GrenobleGrenoble Cédex 09France

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