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The role of electron-hole interaction in the optical spectra of semiconductors and insulators

  • Werner Hanke
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Solid State Physics book series (ASSP, volume 19)

Abstract

The influence of many-particle effects on the optical spectra is discussed and reviewed. Emphasis is centered on the role played by these effects in the continuum of electron-hole transitions. The discussion is based on a Green's function formulation of the electron-hole interaction which takes into account both screened electron-hole attraction and its exchange counterpart. They give rise to the excitonic effects including Frenkel limit and intermediate coupling regimes and to the RPA local-field effects, respectively. Quantitative calculations of absorption and modulation spectra in C (diamond), Si and TlCl are reviewed in detail. They demonstrate the important role played by both of these many-particle corrections on the optical absorption strength and in particular on the interrelation of one-electron interband transitions and experimental absorption structure. Similar investigations for the plasmon response are commented.

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Copyright information

© Friedr. Vieweg & Sohn Verlagsgesellschaft mbH 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Werner Hanke
    • 1
  1. 1.Max-Planck-Institut für FestkörperforschungStuttgartGermany

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