Advertisement

Computational experiments using distributed tools in a web-based electronic notebook environment

  • Allen D. Malony
  • Jenifer L. Skidmore
  • Matthew J. Sottile
Track C2: Computational Science
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1593)

Abstract

Computational environments used by scientists should provide high-level support for scientific processes that involve the integrated and systematic use of familiar abstractions from a laboratory setting, including notebooks, instruments, experiments, and analysis tools. However, doing so while hiding the complexities of the underlying computational platform is a challenge. ViNE is a web-based electronic notebook that implements a high-level interface for applying computational tools in scientific experiments in a location- and platform-independent manner. Using ViNE, a scientist can specify data and tools and construct experiments that apply them in well-defined procedures. ViNE's implementation of the experiment abstraction offers the scientist easy-to-understand framework for building scientific processes. This paper discusses how ViNE implements computational experiments in distributed, heterogeneous computing environments.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    K. Arnold and J. Gosling, The Java Programming Language, Addison-Welsey, 1996.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Brain Electrophysiology Laboratory. http://hebb.uoregon.edu/brainlab/belHome.html.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    J. Cuny et al. Building Domain-Specific Environments for Computational Science: A Case Study in Seismic Tomography, International Journal of Supercomputing Applications and High Performance Computing, Vol. 11, No. 3, pp. 179–196, 1997.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    D. Edelson, R. Pea, and L. Gomez, The Collaboratory Notebook. Communications of the ACM, Vol. 39, No. 4, April 1996, pp. 32–33.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    A. Geist and N. Nachtigal, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Electronic Notebook Project. http://www./epm.ornl.gov/geist/java/applets/enote/.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    J. Hong et al., Personal Electronic Notebook with Sharing, Proceedings of the Fourth Workshop on Enabling Technology: Infrastructure for Collaborative Enterprises, April 1995.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    The Math Works, MATLAB: High Performance Numeric Computation and Visualization Software Reference Guide Natick, MA. 1992.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    J. Myers et al., Electronic Laboratory Notebooks for Collaborative Research, Proceedings of the IEEE Fifth Workshop on Enabling Technology: Infrastructure for Collaborative Enterprises, June 1996.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    B. Rex and D. St. Pierre, PNNL NMR Electronic Logbook, Proceedings of the IEEE Fifth Workshop on Enabling Technology: Infrastructure for Collaborative Enterprises, June 1996.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    J. Skidmore, et al., A Prototype Notebook-Based Environment for Computational Tools, Proceedings of SC98, November 1998.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Allen D. Malony
    • 1
  • Jenifer L. Skidmore
    • 1
  • Matthew J. Sottile
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer and Information ScienceUniversity of OregonEugene

Personalised recommendations