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Posets for configurations!

  • Arend Rensink
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 630)

Abstract

We define families of posets, ordered by prefixes, as the counterpart of the usual families of configurations ordered by subsets. On these objects we define two types of morphism: event and order morphisms, resulting in categories FPos and FPos . We then show the following:
  • Families of posets, in contrast to families of configurations, are always prime algebraic; in fact the category FPos is equivalent to the category of prime algebraic domains;

  • On the level of events, FPos is equivalent to the category of prime algebraic domains with an additional relation encoding event identity.

  • The (abstract) event identity relation can be used to characterize concrete relations between events such as binary conflict and causal flow;

  • One can characterize a wide range of event-based models existing in the literature as families of posets satisfying certain specific structural conditions formulated in terms of event identity.

Keywords

Event Structure Event Base Event Identity Order Level Compact Element 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arend Rensink
    • 1
  1. 1.University of TwenteAE EnschedeThe Netherlands

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