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Computer assisted quantitative analysis of deformities of the human spine

  • B. Verdonck
  • R. Nijlunsing
  • F. A. Gerritsen
  • J. Cheung
  • D. J. Wever
  • A. Veldhuizen
  • S. Devillers
  • S. Makram-Ebeid
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1496)

Abstract

Nowadays, conventional X-ray radiographs are still the images of choice for evaluating spinal deformaties such as scoliosis. However, digital translation reconstruction gives easy access to high quality, digital overview images of the entire spine. This work aims at improving the description of the scoliotic deformity by developing semi-automated tools to assist the extraction of anatomical landmarks (on vertebral bodies and pedicles) and the calculation of deformity quantifying parameters. These tools are currently validated in a clinical setting.

Keywords

Vertebral Body Vertebral Column Spinal Deformity Human Spine Entire Spine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Verdonck
    • 1
  • R. Nijlunsing
    • 1
  • F. A. Gerritsen
    • 1
  • J. Cheung
    • 2
  • D. J. Wever
    • 2
  • A. Veldhuizen
    • 2
  • S. Devillers
    • 3
  • S. Makram-Ebeid
    • 3
  1. 1.Philips Medical Systems Nederland B.V.DA BestThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Academic Hospital GroningenRB GroningenThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Laboratoires d’Electronique Philips S.A.S.Limeil-Brevannes cedexFrance

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