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The Ravenscar tasking profile for high integrity real-time programs

  • A. Burns
  • B. Dobbing
  • G. Romanski
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1411)

Abstract

The Ravenscar profile defines a simple subset of the tasking features of Ada in order to support efficient, high integrity applications that need to be analysed for their timing properties. This paper describes the Profile and gives the motivations for the features it does (and does not) include. An implementation of the profile is then described in terms of development practice and requirements, run-time characteristics, certification, size, testing and scheduling analysis. Support tools are discussed as are the means by which the timing characteristics of the run-time can be obtained. The important issue of enforcing the restrictions imposed by the Ravenscar profile is also addressed.

Keywords

Runtime System Schedulability Analyser Protected Object Concurrency Model Formal Certification 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Burns
    • 1
  • B. Dobbing
    • 2
  • G. Romanski
    • 2
  1. 1.Real-Time Systems Research Group Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of YorkUK
  2. 2.AonixSan DiegoUSA

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