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On-Line matching routing on trees

  • Alan Roberts
  • Antonios Symvonis
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1380)

Abstract

We examine on-line heap construction and on-line permutation routing on trees under the matching model. Let T be and n-node tree of maximum degree d. By providing on-line algorithms we prove that:
  1. (1)

    For a rooted tree of height h, on-line heap construction can be completed within (2d−1)h routing steps.

     
  2. (2)

    For an arbitrary tree, on-line permutation routing can be completed within 4dn routing steps.

     
  3. (3)

    For a complete d-ary tree, on-line permutation routing can be completed within 2(d−1)n+2dlog2n routing steps.

     

Keywords

Maximum Degree Rooted Tree Matching Model Active Edge Arbitrary Tree 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan Roberts
    • 1
  • Antonios Symvonis
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of SydneyAustralia

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