Advertisement

On unifying relational and object-oriented database systems

Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 615)

Abstract

The past several years have been the gestation period for a new generation of database technology. There has been a flurry of activities to develop and experiment with database systems that support an object-oriented data model or that extend the relational data model with some object-oriented facilities. These activities have been fueled by the emergence of a broad spectrum of database applications which relational database systems cannot support and the increasing need to achieve another productivity leap in application development. As a result of these efforts, there is now a sufficient body of knowledge for the development of a commercially viable next-generation database system. Such a system should support a unified relational and object-oriented data model; that is, a full object-oriented data model in a way that is completely compatible with the relational model. This article examines motivations for unifying the relational and object-oriented data models in a single database system, and outlines design and implementation issues that must be addressed in building such a system.

Keywords

Database System Path Query Create Class Relational Database System Relational Data Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Abiteboul, S., and A. Bonner. “Objects and Views,” in Proc. ACM SIGMOD Intl. Conf. on Management of Data, Denver, Colorado, May 1991, pp. 238–247.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Andrews, T., and C. Harris. “Combining Language and Database Advances in an Object-Oriented Development Environment,” in Proc. Intl. Conf. on Object-Oriented Programming Languages, Systems, and Applications, Orlando, FL., October 1987, pp. 430–440.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    American National Standards for Information Systems. Database Language SQL. ANSI X3.135-1986, October 1986.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Atkinson, M., et al. “An Approach to Persistent Programming,” Computer Journal, vol. 26, no. 4, November 1983, pp. 360–365.zbMATHGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Atkinson, M., et al. “Object-Oriented Database System Manifesto,” in Proc. 1st Intl. Conf. on Deductive and Object-Oriented Databases, Kyoto, Japan, Dec. 1989.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Banerjee, J., W. Kim, H.J. Kim, and H.F. Korth. “Semantics and Implementation of Schema Evolution in Object-Oriented Databases,” in Proc. ACM SIGMOD Intl. Conf. on Management of Data, San Francisco, Calif., May 1987.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Beech, D. “A Foundation for Evolution from Relational to Object Databases,” inProc. Intl. Conf. on Extending Data Base Technology, Venice, Italy, March 1988.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Bretl, R., et. al. “The GemStone Data Management System,” Object-Oriented Concepts, Applications, and Databases, (ed. W. Kim, and F. Lochovsky), Addison-Wesley, 1989.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Carey, M., D. DeWitt, and S. Vandenberg. “A Data Model and Query Language for EXODUS,” in Proc. ACM SIGMOD Intl. Conf. on Management of Data, Chicago, Ill., June 1988, pp. 413–423.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Cluet, S., C. Delobel, C. Lecluse, and P. Richard. “Reloop: An Algebra-Based Query Language for an Object-Oriented Database System,” in Proc. 1st Intl. Conf. on Deductive and Object-Oriented Databases, Kyoto, Japan, Dec. 1989.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Codd, E.F. “ARelational Model for Large Shared Data Banks,” Comm. ACM, vol. 13, no. 6, October. 1970, pp. 377–387.zbMATHCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Codd, E.F. “Extending the Relational Model to Capture More Meaning,” ACM Trans. on Database Systems, vol. 4, no. 4, Dec. 1979.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Date, C. An Introduction to Database Systems (4th edition), Addison-Wesley, Reading, Mass., 1986.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Deux, O., et al. “The Story of O2,” IEEE Trans. on Knowledge and Data Engineering, March 1990.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Fishman, D., et al. “Overview of the IRIS DBMS,” Object-Oriented Concepts, Applications, and Databases, (ed. W. Kim, and F. Lochovsky), Addison-Wesley, 1989.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Goldberg, A. and D. Robson. Smalltalk-80: The Language and its Implementation, Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA 1983.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Kaehler, T. “Virtual Memory for an Object-Oriented Language,” BYTE, pp. 378–387, August 1981.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Kifer, M., W. Kim, and Y. Sagiv. “Querying Object-Oriented Databases,” in Proc. ACM SIGMOD Intl. Conf. on Management of Data, San Diego, Calif., June 1992.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Kim, W. “A Model of Queries for Object-Oriented Databases,” in Proc. Intl. Conf. on Very Large Data Bases, August 1989, Amsterdam, Netherlands.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Kim, W. et al. “Architecture of the ORION Next-Generation Database System,” IEEE Trans. on Knowledge and Data Engineering, March 1990.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Kim, W. “Architectural Issues in Object-Oriented Databases,” Journal of Object-Oriented Programming, March/April 1990.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Kim, W. “Object-Oriented Databases: Definition and Research Directions,” IEEE Trans. on Knowledge and Data Engineering, Sept. 1990.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Kim, W. Introduction to Object-Oriented Databases, MIT Press, November 1990.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Maier, D. “Making Database Systems Fast Enough for CAD Applications,” Object-Oriented Concepts, Applications, and Databases, (ed. W. Kim, and F. Lochovsky), Addison-Wesley, 1989.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Release 1.0, Sept. 1989, EDventure Holdings, Inc., 375 Park Ave., New York, NY.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Selinger, P., et. al. “Access Path Selection in a Relational Database Management System,” in Proc. ACM SIGMOD Intl. Conf. on Management of Data, Boston, Mass., May 1979, pp. 23–34.Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Shaw, G., and S. Zdonik. “Object-Oriented Queries: Equivalence and Optimization,” in Proc. 1st Intl. Conf. on Deductive and Object-Oriented Databases, Kyoto, Japan, Dec. 1989.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Smith, J., and D. Smith. “Database Abstraction: Aggregation and Generalization,” ACM Trans. on Database Systems, vol. 2, no. 2, June 1977, pp. 105–133.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Stefik, M. and D.G. Bobrow. “Object-Oriented Programming: Themes and Variations,” The AI Magazine, January 1986, pp. 40–62.Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Stonebraker, M., and L. Rowe. “The Design of POSTGRES,” in Proc. ACM SIGMOD Intl. Conf. on Management of Data, Washington, D.C., May 1986.Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Stonebraker, M., J. Anton, and E. Hanson. “Extending a Database System with Procedures,” ACM Trans. on Database Systems, vol. 12, no. 3, Sept. 1987.Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Stroustrup, B. The C++ Programming Language, Addison-Wesley, Reading, Mass. 1986.Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Ullman, J. Principles of Database Systems (2nd edition), Computer Science Press, Rockvile, MD, 1982.Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    Woelk, D., and W. Kim. “Multimedia Information Management in an Object-Oriented Database System,” in Proc. Intl. Conf. on Very Large Data Bases, Brighton, England, Sept. 1987, pp. 319–329.Google Scholar
  35. 35.
    Zaniolo, C. “The Database Language GEM,” in Proc. ACM SIGMOD Intl. Conf. on Management of Data, San Jose, Calif., May 1983, pp. 207–218.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Won Kim
    • 1
  1. 1.UniSQL, Inc.Austin

Personalised recommendations