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Hyperkonjugation

  • Friedrich Becker
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Part of the Fortschritte der Chemischen Forschung book series (TOPCURRCHEM, volume 3/2)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1955

Authors and Affiliations

  • Friedrich Becker
    • 1
  1. 1.Chemisches Institut der UniversitätSaarbrücken

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