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Die Sensibilisierung der photographischen Schicht durch Farbstoffe

Ihr Wesen im Licht der neueren Forschung
  • Hans Wolff
Conference paper
Part of the Fortschritte der Chemischen Forschung book series (TOPCURRCHEM, volume 3/3)

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© Springer-Verlag 1955

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hans Wolff
    • 1
  1. 1.Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut der UniversitätHeidelberg

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