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Spelling correction for an intelligent tutoring system

  • Yoon Hee Lee
  • Martha Evens
  • Joel A. Michael
  • Allen A. Rovick
Track 2: Artificial Intelligence
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 507)

Abstract

Our spelling correction program is part of a system for understanding illformed input in an intelligent tutoring system for medical students. Speed and user-friendliness were the most important considerations in the design. The system can correct most kinds of spelling errors including order reversal, missing characters, added characters, and character substitutions. It also handles novel abbreviations and word boundary errors. It is implemented on a Xerox 1108 AI machine in Interlisp-D. The lexicon is stored in a trie structure to speed up searching. We provide the students with a full-screen editor and an input tracer to simplify the input process as much as possible.

Keywords

Lexical Entry Disagreement Threshold Intelligent Tutoring System Input String Spelling Error 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoon Hee Lee
    • 1
  • Martha Evens
    • 1
  • Joel A. Michael
    • 2
  • Allen A. Rovick
    • 2
  1. 1.Illinois Institute of TechnologyChicago
  2. 2.Rush Medical CollegeChicago

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