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Event-related slow (DC) potentials in the human brain

  • Manfred Haider
  • Elisabeth Groll-Knapp
  • Josef A. Ganglberger
Chapter
Part of the Reviews of Physiology, Biochemistry and Pharmacology book series (volume 88)

Keywords

Contingent Negative Variation Late Potential Readiness Potential Late Positive Component Multidisciplinary Perspective 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Manfred Haider
    • 1
  • Elisabeth Groll-Knapp
    • 1
  • Josef A. Ganglberger
    • 2
  1. 1.Institut für Umwelthygiene der Universität WienWien
  2. 2.Abteilung für funktionelle Neurochirurgie und klinische NeurophysiologieWien

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