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Sequence Datalog: Declarative string manipulation in databases

  • Anthony Bonner
  • Giansalvatore Mecca
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1154)

Abstract

We investigate logic-based query languages for sequence databases, that is, databases in which strings of symbols over a fixed alphabet can occur. We discuss different approaches to querying strings, including Prolog and Datalog with function symbols, and argue that all of them have important limitations. We then present the semantics of Sequence Datalog, a logic for querying sequence databases, and show how this language can be used to perform structural recursion over sequences.

Keywords

Active Domain Function Symbol Query Language Predicate Symbol Structural Recursion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anthony Bonner
    • 1
  • Giansalvatore Mecca
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  2. 2.D.I.F.A.Università della BasilicataPotenzaItaly

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