Advertisement

Robots as surgical assistants: Where we are, wither we are tending, and how to get there

  • Russell H. Taylor
Keynote Lectures
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1211)

Abstract

This paper concerns the use of “robotic” technologies and systems to significantly improve the ability of human clinicians to perform surgery and other interventional procedures. We discuss briefly several possible taxonomies and adopt one of them to structure a brief overview of the field, using the different roles that robotic systems can play as an organizing principal. Our discussion emphasizes the complementary capabilities of robots and humans, and includes short sections on “intern replacements”, telesurgical systems, robotic navigational aids, precise positioning systems and precise path systems. We conclude with a few remarks on the essential collaboration between clinical end users and robotics technology researchers that is crucial to future progress in this emerging field.

Keywords

Surgical Robot Active Robot Computer Assist Surgery Robotic Assisted Therapy Intern Replacement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Taylor, R.H. and S.D. Stulberg. Medical Robotics Working Group Section Report. in NSF Workshop on Medical Robotics and Computer-Assisted Medical Interventions (RCAMI). 1996. Bristol, England: Shadyside Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pa.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    McEwen, J.A. Solo surgery with automated positioning platforms. in Proc.of NSF Workshop on Computer Assisted Surgery. 1993. Washington D.C.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    McEwen, J.A., et al. Development and initial clinical evaluation of pre-robotic and robotic retraction systems for surgery. in Proc. Second Workshop on Medical and Health Care Robotics. 1989. Newcastle-onTyne.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Sackier, J.M. and Y. Wang, Robotically Assisted Laparoscopic Surgery: from Concept to Development, in Computer-Integrated Surgery, R. Taylor, et al., Editors. 1996, MIT Press: Cambridge, Mass. p. 577–580.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Petelin, J.B. Computer Assisted Surgical Instrument Control. in Proc. Medicine Meets Virtual Reality II. 1994. San Diego.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Taylor, R.H., et al., A Telerobotic Assistant for Laparoscopic Surgery, in IEEE EMBS Magazine Special Issue on Robotics in Surgery. 1995. p. 279–291.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Green, P., et al. Mobile Telepresence Surgery. in Proc. 2nd Int. Symp. on Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery. 1995. Baltimore, Md.: MRCAS '95 Symposium, C/O Center for Orthop Res, Shadyside Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pa.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Mitsuishi, M., et al. A Telemicrosurgery System with Colocated View and Operation Points and Rotational-force-feedback-free Master Manipulator. in Proc. 2nd Int. Symp. on Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery. 1995. Baltimore, Md.: MRCAS '95 Symposium, C/O Center for Orthop Res, Shadyside Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pa.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Satava, R., Virtual Reality, Telesurgery, and the New World Order of Medicine. Journal of Image-Guided Surgery, 1995. 1(1): p. 12–16.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Kavoussi, L., et al., Telerobotic-Assisted Laparoscopic Surgery: Initial Laboratory and Clinical Experience.Urology, 1994. 44(1): p. 15–19.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Schenker, P.S. and S.T. Charles. Development of a Telemantpulator for Dexterity Enhanced Microsurgery. in Proc. 2nd Int. Symp. on Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery. 1995. Baltimore, Md.: MRCAS '95 Symposium, C/O Center for Orthop Res, Shadyside Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pa.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Watanabe, E., The Neuronavigator: A Computer-Controlled Navigation System in Neurosurgery, in Computer-Integrated Surgery, R.H. Taylor, et al., Editors. 1996, MIT Press: Cambridge, Mass. p. 319–327.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Reinhardt, H.F., Neuronagivation: A ten years review, in Computer-Integrated Surgery, R. Taylor, et al., Editors. 1996, MIT Press: Cambridge. p. 329–342.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Nolte, L.P., et al. A Novel Approach to Computer Assisted Spine Surgery. in First Int. Symp. on Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery (MRCAS 94). 1994. Pittsburgh: Shadyside Hospital.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Lavallee, S., et al. Computer-Assisted Knee Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction First Clinical Trials. in First Int. Symp. on Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery (MRCAS 94). 1994. Pittsburgh: Shadyside Hospital.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Cutting, C.B., F.L. Bookstein, and R.H. Taylor, Applications of Simulation, Morphometrics and Robotics in Craniofacial Surgery, in Computer-Integrated Surgery, R.H. Taylor, et al., Editors. 1996, MIT Press: Cambridge, Mass. p. 641–662.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Cutting, C., et al. Optical Tracking of Bone Fragments During Craniofacial Surgery. in Proc. 2nd Int. Symp. on Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery. 1995. Baltimore, Md.: MRCAS '95 Symposium, C/O Center for Orthop Res, Shadyside Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pa.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Taylor, R.H., et al., An Image-directed Robotic System for Precise Orthopaedic Surgery.IEEE Transactions on Robotics and Automation, 1994. 10(3): p. 261–275.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Lavallee, S., et al., Image-Guided Operating Robot: A Clinical Application in Stereotactic Neurosurgery, in Computer-Integrated Surgery, R.H. Taylor, et al., Editors. 1996, MIT Press: Cambridge, Mass. p. 343–352.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Kwoh, Y.S., Hou. J., and E.A. Jonckheere, et. al., A robot with improved absolute positioning accuracy for CT guided stereotactic brain surgery. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng, 1988. 35(2): p. 153–161.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Lavallee, S., Registration for Computer-Integrated Surgery: Methodology, State of the Art, in Computer-Integrated Surgery, R.H. Taylor, et al., Editors. 1996, MIT Press: Cambridge, Mass. p. 77–98.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Garbini, J.L., et al. Robotic Instrumentation in Total Knee Arthroplasty. in Proc. 33rd Annual Meeting, Orthopaedic Research Society. 1987. San Francisco.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Radermacher, K., G. Rau, and H.-W. Staudte, Computer-Integrated Orthopaedic Surgery: Connection of Planning and Execution in Surgical Intervention, in Computer-Integrated Surgery, R.H. Taylor, et al., Editors. 1996, MIT Press: Cambridge, Mass. p. 451–463.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Anderson, J.P., et al., Image-Guided Percutaneous Robotic Assisted Therapy,. 1995, The Johns Hopkins University: Baltimore, Maryland.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Mittelstadt, B., et al., The Evolution of a Surgical Robot from Prototype to Human Clinical Use, in Computer-Integrated Surgery, R.H. Taylor, et al., Editors. 1996, MIT Press: Cambridge, Mass. p. 397–407.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Joskowicz, L., et al. Computer-Integrated Revision Total Hip Replacement Surgery: Preliminary Results. in Proc. 2nd Int. Symp. on Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery. 1995. Baltimore, Md.: MRCAS '95 Symposium, C/O Center for Orthop Res, Shadyside Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pa.Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Bargar, W., et al. Robodoc Multi-Center Trial: An Interim Report. in Proc. 2nd Int. Symp. on Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery. 1995. Baltimore, Md.: MRCAS '95 Symposium, C/O Center for Orthop Res, Shadyside Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pa.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Marcacci, S., et al., Computer-Assisted Knee Arthroplasty, in Computer-Integrated Surgery, R.H. Taylor, et al., Editors. 1996, MIT Press: Cambridge, Mass. p. 417–423.Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    DiGioia, A.M., B. Jaramaz, and R.V. O'Toole. An Integrated Approach to Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery in Orthopaedics. in Proc. 1st Int. Symposium on Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery. 1994. Pittsburgh.Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Ho, S.C., R.D. Hibberd, and B.L. Davies, Robot Assisted Knee Surgery. IEEE EMBS Magazine Sp. Issue on Robotics in Surgery, 1995(April–May): p. 292–300.Google Scholar
  31. 31.
    Delnondediey, J.Y. and J. Troccaz. PADyC: A Passive Arm with Dynamic Constraints — A two degree-of-freedom prototype. in Proc. 2nd Int. Symp. on Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery. 1995. Baltimore, Md.: MRCAS '95 Symposium, C/O Center for Orthop Res, Shadyside Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pa.Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Kall, B.A., Kelly, Patrick J., and S.J. Goerss, Interactive Stereotactic Surgical System for the Removal of Intracranial Tunors Utilizing eh CO2 Laser and CT Derived Database. IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, 1985. February: p. 1120–16.Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Nathan, M.S., et al. Devices for Automated Resection of the Prostate. in Proc. 1st International Symposium on Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery. 1994. Pittsburgh.Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    Adler John, et al., Image-Guided Robotic Radiosurgery. In the Proceedings of the First International Symposium on Medical Robotics and Computer assisted Surgery, 1994. 2: p. 291–297.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Russell H. Taylor
    • 1
  1. 1.Computer Science DepartmentThe Johns Hopkins UniversityBaltimore

Personalised recommendations