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Decision-making with Belief Functions and pignistic probabilities

  • Nic Wilson
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 747)

Abstract

The paper discusses the different approaches to decision-making using Belief Functions. In particular, I describe Philippe Smets' method of decisionmaking, which transforms a Belief Function into a single probability function, the pignistic probability function. This transformation is sensitive to the choice of frame of discernment, which is often, to a large extent, arbitrary. It thus seems natural to consider all refinements of a frame of discernment and their associated pignistic probability functions and decisions. The main result of the paper is that this is equivalent to the standard approach.

Keywords

Utility Function Probability Function Mass Function Expected Utility Belief Function 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nic Wilson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceQueen Mary and Westfield CollegeLondonUK

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