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The analysis of geographical data

Data rich, technology adequate, theory poor
  • David Rhind
  • Stan Openshaw
  • Nick Green
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Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 339)

Abstract

This paper describes the current and near-future situation in geographical data processing from several viewpoints. It commences with a summary of — so far as is known — user needs in relation to functionality and other characteristics of the necessary software (Geographical Information Systems or GIS). The burgeoning availability of certain types of spatially referenced data is described; the data structures used or developed to date are summarised, together with their advantages and disadvantages. The most powerful uses of GIS — modelling or spatial analysis — are presently rare but one example, based upon Openshaw's Geographical Analysis Machine, is presented; based on experience with this tool and much else, the shortcomings of existing software tools are described and future collaborative research to remedy these shortcomings is outlined.

Keywords

Geographic Information System Modifiable Areal Unit Problem Ordnance Survey Natural Environment Research Council Birkbeck College 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Rhind
    • 1
  • Stan Openshaw
    • 2
  • Nick Green
    • 1
  1. 1.Birkbeck CollegeUniversity of LondonLondon
  2. 2.Department of GeographyThe UniversityNewcastle upon Tyne

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