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Knowledge elicitation for software engineering expertise

  • Julian S. Weitzenfeld
  • Thomas R. Riedl
  • Jared T. Freeman
  • Gary A. Klein
  • John Musa
Session 7 Developing Software Engineering Expertise
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 536)

Abstract

Software engineers typically show considerable growth in abilities over the first 5–10 years on the job. We propose that knowledge elicitation methods, normally associated with the design of expert systems, can be used to design training to accelerate this growth of human expertise. This paper examines some of the issues that arise in using such methods to develop expertise-focused training as we confronted them in a study we conducted to produce materials for a course to accelerate the development of software system debugging skills.

Keywords

Bell Laboratory Subject Matter Expert Knowledge Elicitation Critical Incident Technique Debug Tool 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Bibliography

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julian S. Weitzenfeld
    • 1
  • Thomas R. Riedl
    • 1
  • Jared T. Freeman
    • 1
  • Gary A. Klein
    • 2
  • John Musa
    • 3
  1. 1.Software Quality ServicesEast Windson
  2. 2.Klein AssociatesYellow Springs
  3. 3.AT&T Bell LaboratoriesMurray Hill

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