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Models for undergraduate project courses in software engineering

  • Mary Shaw
  • James E. Tomayko
Session 1 “A Family Album Of Software Project Courses”
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 536)

Abstract

The software engineering course provides undergraduates with an opportunity to learn something about real-world software development. Since software engineering is far from being a mature engineering discipline, it is not possible to define a completely satisfactory syllabus. Content with a sound basis is in short supply, and the material most often taught is at high risk of becoming obsolete within a few years.

Undergraduate software engineering courses are now offered in more than 100 universities. Although three textbooks dominate the market, there is not yet consensus on the scope and form of the course. The two major decisions an instructor faces are the balance between technical and management topics and the relation between the lecture and project components. We discuss these two decisions, with support from sample syllabi and survey data on course offerings in the US and Canada. We also offer some advice on the management of a project-oriented course.

Keywords

Software Development Software Engineering Englewood Cliff Software Engineer IEEE Computer Society 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary Shaw
    • 1
  • James E. Tomayko
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Computer Science & Software Engineering InstituteCarnegie Mellon UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Software Engineering InstituteCarnegie Mellon UniversityUSA

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