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Two-level models of hypertext

  • James Mayfield
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1326)

Abstract

A two-level model of hypertext is one in which a set of texts is augmented with an ancillary structure that captures some aspect of the meaning of those texts. Links between texts are routed through the ancillary structure. This chapter surveys the wide range of two-level hypertext models that have been developed in the past few years. Declarative ancillary structures have included semantic nets, Petri nets, Bayesian nets, and clustering schemes. Procedural ancillary structures have been used to identify new links dynamically, and to create large sets of static links. Advantages of two-level models include greater link expressiveness, increased user control over the appearance and semantics of links, decreased hypertext construction costs, and improved robustness in the face of changing and ill-formed texts.

Keywords

Computing Machinery Text Block Uniform Resource Locator Context Node NIST Special Publication 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Mayfield
    • 1
  1. 1.The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics LaboratoryLaurelUSA

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