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A survey of two-dimensional automata theory

  • Katsushi Inoue
  • Itsuo Takanami
Chapter 2 Machines
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 381)

Abstract

The main purpose of this paper is to survey several properties of alternating, nondeterministic, and deterministic two-dimensional Turing machines (including two-dimensional finite automata and marker automata), and to briefly survey cellular types of two-dimensional automata.

Keywords

Cellular Automaton Turing Machine Finite Automaton Closure Property Input Tape 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katsushi Inoue
    • 1
  • Itsuo Takanami
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Electronics, Faculty of EngineeringYamaguchi UniversityUbeJapan

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