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An evaluation of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic materials

Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Biochemical Engineering book series (ABE, volume 5)

Abstract

The diminishing one-way resources must be replaced by renewable, plentiful organic materials such as cellulose. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose has been intensively studied in recent years, since acid hydrolysis has not proved to be economically feasible. In spite of the abundance of cellulose, it is not very easy to find suitable cellulosic materials that could be collected from a limited area and would be cheap enough, taking into account collecting, transport, handling, and storage costs. The correct choice of material depends on local conditions. For example, sugarcane bagasse would be useful in certain areas.

An enzyme preparation capable of completely breaking down cellulose is needed for the hydrolysis. Trichoderma viride is the most efficient producer of extracellular cellulases known at present. Since several types of cellulases are needed, it is possible that two or more organisms will be used in the future. Pretreatment of cellulosic materials prior to hydrolysis is inevitable, but all the known methods, such as alkali treatment or ball-milling, are rather costly. The product of complete hydrolysis is glucose, which can be used as such for various purposes or as raw material for other products. The economic feasibility of processes based on enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic materials is uncertain so far, but the potential of these processes encourages further developmental work.

Keywords

Enzymatic Hydrolysis Rice Straw Sugarcane Bagasse Cellulosic Material Alkali Treatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Biotechnical LaboratoryTechnical Research Centre of FinlandHelsinki 12Finland

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