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Tiger Mothers, Dragon Children

  • Charlene Tan
Chapter
Part of the Education in the Asia-Pacific Region: Issues, Concerns and Prospects book series (EDAP, volume 21)

Abstract

Shanghai parents and children value education in a highly competitive environment and channel most of their energies to achieve educational excellence for the children.

Keywords

Chinese Student School Principal School Choice Admission Test Senior Secondary School 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charlene Tan
    • 1
  1. 1.Policy and Leadership Studies National Institute of EducationNanyang Technological UniversitySingaporeSingapore

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