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Ethical Dilemmas of a Self-Study Researcher: A Narrative Analysis of Ethics in the Process of S-STEP Research

  • Stefinee PinnegarEmail author
  • M. Shaun Murphy
Chapter
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Part of the Self-Study of Teaching and Teacher Education Practices book series (STEP, volume 20)

Abstract

In this chapter, we articulate the ethical tensions we have experienced as we engage in research. We identified tensions around self as researcher and researched, place, practice, context, interpretation, presentation, and institutional review boards (IRB). We then reconsidered our categorization using the characteristics of intimate scholarship as a framework. These characteristics include relationship, vulnerability, ontology, dialogue, and openness (Hamilton ML, Pinnegar S: Knowing, becoming, doing as teacher educators: identity, intimate scholarship, inquiry. Emerald Publishing, Bingley, 2015). This framework allows for deeper, more nuanced, and more integrated analysis and representation of our ethical tension. We make a distinction in our work between the moral and the ethical. We attend to ethical dilemmas of relationship, from attending to the particular, of vulnerability, from openness, of interpretation through dialogue, from ontology.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Teacher EducationBrigham Young UniversityProvoUSA
  2. 2.Department of Educational FoundationsSaskatoonCanada

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