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Bilingual Identity: Being and Becoming Bilingual

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Abstract

Exploring issues of identity can be extremely complex, and necessitate engagement with a wide range of different fields that have explored the notion of identity in different ways. Exploring prior work is needed in order to ascertain one’s own standpoint about what identity is, how it might be measured or captured, and why we might want to understand it in more depth. In this chapter I will clarify the position on identity and bilingualism that is being operationalized in this study. I will describe the framework for the study: The Bilingual Identity Negotiation Framework.

Keywords

Minority Language Bilingual Education Home Language Literacy Practice Bilingual Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Arts & DesignUniversity of CanberraCanberraAustralia

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